Australasia's Biggest Online Store

Shop over 1.5 Million Toys in our Huge New Range

Hurry - Only 3 left in stock!
'In spite of all the hand-wringing over the international community's failures to stop past crimes against humanity, we have not yet developed a consistent approach to the aftermath of these crimes. A sort of 'cottage industry devoted to denying that the Khmer Rouge committed any crimes' has appeared in Cambodia, as Craig Etcheson explains in ""After the Killing Fields"", and a new generation of Cambodians is growing up in a society where perpetrators of unbelievable evil walk free' - ""Times Literary Supplement"". 'Craig Etcheson is well known internationally as an expert dedicated to documenting the bitter harvest of the Khmer Rouge's grip on the Cambodian people, 1975-1978, and to evaluating its enduring aftermath...""After the Killing Fields"" is a thorough insider's description of the Documentation Center of Cambodia's valuable work. More importantly, the book probes the culture of impunity and enhances our understanding of this extraordinarily complex issue. It is a major contribution to genocide studies, as well as an eloquent tribute to the Cambodians who suffered under the Khmer Rouge' - ""Frederick Z. Brown, ""H-Genocide"". 'New findings show that the death toll from the Cambodian genocide was approximately 2.2 million about a half million higher than commonly believed. Despite regular denials from the surviving leaders of the Khmer Rouge, in ""After the Killing Fields"" Craig Etcheson demonstrates not only that they were aware of the mass killings, but that they personally managed and directed them. This book details the work of Yale Universitys Cambodian Genocide Program, which laid the evidentiary basis for the forthcoming Khmer Rouge Tribunal. The book also presents the information collected through the Mass Grave Mapping Project of the Documentation Center of Cambodia and reveals that the pattern of killing was relatively uniform throughout the country. Detailing the struggle to come to terms with what happened in Cambodia, Etcheson concludes that real justice is not merely elusive, but in fact may be impossible, for crimes on the scale of genocide. ""After the Killing Fields"" should be mandatory reading for anyone interested in Cambodia and international law' - Peter Maguire, author of ""Facing Death in Cambodia"". Etcheson draws on extensive field-work, archival research, and his own analytical skills to bring the horrors of the Khmer Rouge into focus and to make readers aware of the many-faceted, saddening aftermath of that murderous regime. David Chandler, author of ""Voices from S-21: Terror and History in Pol Pots Secret Prison"". Craig Etcheson is a principal founder of the Documentation Center of Cambodia in Phnom Penh and former Program Manager and Acting Director of the Cambodia Genocide Program at Yale University.
Product Details

About the Author

Craig Etcheson is a principal founder of the Documentation Center of Cambodia in Phnom Penh and former Program Manager and Acting Director of the Cambodia Genocide Program at Yale University.

Reviews

"More than 25 years after the fall of the Khmer Rouge regime, those responsible for genocide and human rights violations in Cambodia have yet to answer for their crimes. Why has justice for the Cambodian people been so elusive? Etcheson argues that a culture of impunity persists in Cambodia, and that national reconciliation and healing will require a properly conducted war crimes tribunal, perhaps overseen by the UN. The author describes the efforts of the Documentation Center of Cambodia in amassing proof that the leaders of the Khmer Rouge ordered mass executions throughout Cambodia during the 1975-79 regime. But the abuses began earlier and continue to the present. Moreover, no one in Cambodia's political elite is completely untainted. Etcheson's historical and legal concerns are intertwined, since the evidence from documents, interviews, and eyewitness accounts, backed up by physical evidence from mass graves, is meant to combat the denial syndrome that is part of Cambodia's tragic and apparently intractable situation. These essays will appeal mainly to specialists in Cambodian political history and international politics, as well as to other readers interested in legal remedies for political violence and genocide. Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate students/faculty."-Choice "After the Killing Fields: Lessons from the Cambodian Genocide is a thorough insider's description of the Documentation Center of Cambodia's valuable work. More importantly, the book probes the culture of impunity and enhances our understanding of this extraordinarily complex issue. It is a major contribution to genocide studies, as well as an eloquent tribute to the Cambodians who suffered under the Khmer Rouge."-H-Net: Humanities and Social Science Reviews Online -- H-Genocide "[E]tcheson's great contribution is his orderly, detailed relating of DC-Cam's postwar research into the organization and location of mass murder as well as international legal efforts to bring surviving perpetrators to account."-MultiCultural Review "After the Killing Fields is a thorough description of the step-by-step accumulation of evidence of Khmer Rouge crimes."-Times Literary Supplement "How did the Khmer Rouge get away with genocide?" Craig Etcheson's After the Killing Fields answers this deceptively simple question. Etcheson has mapped killing fileds, interviewed the killers themselves, and his decades of empirical research in Cambodia have endowed him with refreshing common sense. After the Killing Fields should be mandatory reading for anyone interested in Cambodia and international law."-Peter Maguire, author of Law and War: An American Story and Facing Death in Cambodia "Etcheson's absorbing study reflects almost a quarter century of sustained and fruitful work on Khmer Rouge regime in Cambodia (1975-1979) and on what has happened in Cambodia since then. Etcheson draws on extensive field-work, archival research and his own analytical skills to bring the horrors of the Khmer Rouge into focus and to make readers aware of the many faceted, saddening aftermath of that murderous regime. At a time when trial for at least some of the Khmer Rouge leaders seems finally in sight, After the Killing Fields is a timely and sobering study of the vitality of realpolitik, the need for justice in Cambodia, the pains of memory, and the fragility of reconciliation."-David Chandler Author of Voices from S-21: Terror and History in Pol Pot's Secret Prison --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Look for similar items by category
How Fishpond Works
Fishpond works with suppliers all over the world to bring you a huge selection of products, really great prices, and delivery included on over 25 million products that we sell. We do our best every day to make Fishpond an awesome place for customers to shop and get what they want — all at the best prices online.
Webmasters, Bloggers & Website Owners
You can earn a 5% commission by selling After the Killing Fields: Lessons from the Cambodian Genocide (Modern Southeast Asia Series) on your website. It's easy to get started - we will give you example code. After you're set-up, your website can earn you money while you work, play or even sleep! You should start right now!
Authors / Publishers
Are you the Author or Publisher of a book? Or the manufacturer of one of the millions of products that we sell. You can improve sales and grow your revenue by submitting additional information on this title. The better the information we have about a product, the more we will sell!
Item ships from and is sold by Fishpond.com, Inc.
Back to top