COVID-19 Response at Fishpond.com.au

Read what we're doing...

Another Little Piece of My Heart
By

Rating

Product Description
Product Details

About the Author

Richard Goldstein is one of the founders of rock criticism, starting at the Village Voice in 1966, and has reported on culture, politics and sexuality for the New York Times, Harper's, the Nation and elsewhere. He served as executive editor of the Village Voice and was names GLAAD columnist of the year for his gay activism. His books include The Poetry of Rock, Reporting the Counterculture and Homocons: Liberal Society and the Gay Right. He teaches at Hunter College of the City University of New York.

Reviews

"The most gifted journalist in the country." - "Harper's Magazine""As the first pop critic in the United States with a regular column devoted to rock, [Goldstein] presented a theory as well as a practice of pop that took neo-Freudianism, New Journalism, and Pop Art as its referents. Goldstein's music criticism was an ongoing argument against the mass culture critique, highlighting how significant, revolutionary, and thoughtful writing about mass media could be." - Devon Powers, from "Writing the Record: The Village Voice and the Birth of Rock Criticism"


""Another Little Piece of My Heart "is a genuinely essential addition to the bibliography of the revolutionary '60s." --"The Guardian""As arguably the first rock critic, Richard Goldstein was afforded access that would make most fans drool. This memoir finds him getting stoned with Brian Wilson, visiting the Grateful Dead's Haight-Ashbury home, and witnessing a drunken, angry Jim Morrison trying to record with the Doors. Goldstein's tone is thoughtful but humble, and his stories flesh out an era in which rock danced with politics, chaos, and community." --"Rolling Stone""The godfather of rock criticism looks back . . . in his vivid, eccentric new memoir. . . This book conveys what it was like to learn how to fly at the dawn of rock criticism." --"Billboard""For Richard Goldstein, writing about music was a lifeline. The utopian energies of rock provided a window through which he could glimpse a very different kind of future being born. And he recognized instinctively that this new music required a new kind of writing to comprehend it. So he invented it . . . Much of the most riveting material in the book centers on the connection he made with some of the most brilliant and vulnerable of the era's artists: Brian Wilson, Jim Morrison, John Lennon, Janis Joplin. Goldstein reminds us of a time when the relationship between a musician and her fans was personal, even intimate." --"Los Angeles Times""Goldstein has written a witty, insightful, and at times self-lacerating, memoir . . . [of his] experience as rock's most deeply embedded chronicler." --"New York Daily News""A deeply felt and compelling portrait of an age that indelibly marked everyone who took part in it. Indispensable for understanding the culture of the '60s and the music that was at its heart." --"Kirkus Reviews""Goldstein was in the right place at the right time, as he explains in this entertaining music memoir. [His] confessional tone gives significant warmth to the book, encouraging the reader to settle in as Goldstein recalls a tumultuous culture with humility and a healthy perspective." --"Publishers Weekly""What happened to the revolution of the '60's? . . . Richard Goldstein may not be the first person to try to answer that question, but so far he is the most eloquent . . . In "Another Little Piece of My Heart" are some of the best explanations of how and why rock became the social force it is." --Examiner.com"Richard Goldstein's memoir took another little piece of my own heart. It's shrewdly observed, vividly written, steadily thoughtful, and above all honest about the exhilaration and fear that flourished in a time of giddy reinvention." --Todd Gitlin, author of THE SIXTIES: YEARS OF HOPE, DAYS OF RAGE"In silver boots, with flowing hair, Richard Goldstein strode through the 1960s like a hero in a picaresque adventure. He pioneered the new form of rock criticism; reported from the front lines of progressive politics and the counterculture; and, most of all, thoroughly lived the changes that revolutionary era wrought. This memoir provides unique views of some of the time's most colorful figures, including Janis Joplin, Jim Morrison, Susan Sontag, and Andy Warhol. But most of all, it shows us how one electric consciousness--Goldstein's own--emerged and evolved as America itself became new." --Ann Powers, author of WEIRD LIKE US: MY BOHEMIAN AMERICA and TORI AMOS: PIECE BY PIECE


"Another Little Piece of My Heart "is a genuinely essential addition to the bibliography of the revolutionary '60s. "The Guardian" As arguably the first rock critic, Richard Goldstein was afforded access that would make most fans drool. This memoir finds him getting stoned with Brian Wilson, visiting the Grateful Dead's Haight-Ashbury home, and witnessing a drunken, angry Jim Morrison trying to record with the Doors. Goldstein's tone is thoughtful but humble, and his stories flesh out an era in which rock danced with politics, chaos, and community. "Rolling Stone" The godfather of rock criticism looks back . . . in his vivid, eccentric new memoir. . . This book conveys what it was like to learn how to fly at the dawn of rock criticism. "Billboard" For Richard Goldstein, writing about music was a lifeline. The utopian energies of rock provided a window through which he could glimpse a very different kind of future being born. And he recognized instinctively that this new music required a new kind of writing to comprehend it. So he invented it . . . Much of the most riveting material in the book centers on the connection he made with some of the most brilliant and vulnerable of the era's artists: Brian Wilson, Jim Morrison, John Lennon, Janis Joplin. Goldstein reminds us of a time when the relationship between a musician and her fans was personal, even intimate. "Los Angeles Times" Goldstein has written a witty, insightful, and at times self-lacerating, memoir . . . [of his] experience as rock's most deeply embedded chronicler. "New York Daily News" A deeply felt and compelling portrait of an age that indelibly marked everyone who took part in it. Indispensable for understanding the culture of the '60s and the music that was at its heart. "Kirkus Reviews" Goldstein was in the right place at the right time, as he explains in this entertaining music memoir. [His] confessional tone gives significant warmth to the book, encouraging the reader to settle in as Goldstein recalls a tumultuous culture with humility and a healthy perspective. "Publishers Weekly" What happened to the revolution of the '60's? . . . Richard Goldstein may not be the first person to try to answer that question, but so far he is the most eloquent . . . In "Another Little Piece of My Heart" are some of the best explanations of how and why rock became the social force it is. Examiner.com Richard Goldstein's memoir took another little piece of my own heart. It's shrewdly observed, vividly written, steadily thoughtful, and above all honest about the exhilaration and fear that flourished in a time of giddy reinvention. Todd Gitlin, author of THE SIXTIES: YEARS OF HOPE, DAYS OF RAGE In silver boots, with flowing hair, Richard Goldstein strode through the 1960s like a hero in a picaresque adventure. He pioneered the new form of rock criticism; reported from the front lines of progressive politics and the counterculture; and, most of all, thoroughly lived the changes that revolutionary era wrought. This memoir provides unique views of some of the time's most colorful figures, including Janis Joplin, Jim Morrison, Susan Sontag, and Andy Warhol. But most of all, it shows us how one electric consciousness--Goldstein's own--emerged and evolved as America itself became new. Ann Powers, author of WEIRD LIKE US: MY BOHEMIAN AMERICA and TORI AMOS: PIECE BY PIECE"


Another Little Piece of My Heart is a genuinely essential addition to the bibliography of the revolutionary '60s. The Guardian As arguably the first rock critic, Richard Goldstein was afforded access that would make most fans drool. This memoir finds him getting stoned with Brian Wilson, visiting the Grateful Dead's Haight-Ashbury home, and witnessing a drunken, angry Jim Morrison trying to record with the Doors. Goldstein's tone is thoughtful but humble, and his stories flesh out an era in which rock danced with politics, chaos, and community. Rolling Stone The godfather of rock criticism looks back . . . in his vivid, eccentric new memoir. . . This book conveys what it was like to learn how to fly at the dawn of rock criticism. Billboard For Richard Goldstein, writing about music was a lifeline. The utopian energies of rock provided a window through which he could glimpse a very different kind of future being born. And he recognized instinctively that this new music required a new kind of writing to comprehend it. So he invented it . . . Much of the most riveting material in the book centers on the connection he made with some of the most brilliant and vulnerable of the era's artists: Brian Wilson, Jim Morrison, John Lennon, Janis Joplin. Goldstein reminds us of a time when the relationship between a musician and her fans was personal, even intimate. Los Angeles Times Goldstein has written a witty, insightful, and at times self-lacerating, memoir . . . [of his] experience as rock's most deeply embedded chronicler. New York Daily News A deeply felt and compelling portrait of an age that indelibly marked everyone who took part in it. Indispensable for understanding the culture of the '60s and the music that was at its heart. Kirkus Reviews Goldstein was in the right place at the right time, as he explains in this entertaining music memoir. [His] confessional tone gives significant warmth to the book, encouraging the reader to settle in as Goldstein recalls a tumultuous culture with humility and a healthy perspective. Publishers Weekly What happened to the revolution of the '60's? . . . Richard Goldstein may not be the first person to try to answer that question, but so far he is the most eloquent . . . In Another Little Piece of My Heart are some of the best explanations of how and why rock became the social force it is. Examiner.com Richard Goldstein's memoir took another little piece of my own heart. It's shrewdly observed, vividly written, steadily thoughtful, and above all honest about the exhilaration and fear that flourished in a time of giddy reinvention. Todd Gitlin, author of THE SIXTIES: YEARS OF HOPE, DAYS OF RAGE In silver boots, with flowing hair, Richard Goldstein strode through the 1960s like a hero in a picaresque adventure. He pioneered the new form of rock criticism; reported from the front lines of progressive politics and the counterculture; and, most of all, thoroughly lived the changes that revolutionary era wrought. This memoir provides unique views of some of the time's most colorful figures, including Janis Joplin, Jim Morrison, Susan Sontag, and Andy Warhol. But most of all, it shows us how one electric consciousness--Goldstein's own--emerged and evolved as America itself became new. Ann Powers, author of WEIRD LIKE US: MY BOHEMIAN AMERICA and TORI AMOS: PIECE BY PIECE

"

"Another Little Piece of My Heart is a genuinely essential addition to the bibliography of the revolutionary '60s." --The Guardian"As arguably the first rock critic, Richard Goldstein was afforded access that would make most fans drool. This memoir finds him getting stoned with Brian Wilson, visiting the Grateful Dead's Haight-Ashbury home, and witnessing a drunken, angry Jim Morrison trying to record with the Doors. Goldstein's tone is thoughtful but humble, and his stories flesh out an era in which rock danced with politics, chaos, and community." --Rolling Stone"The godfather of rock criticism looks back . . . in his vivid, eccentric new memoir. . . This book conveys what it was like to learn how to fly at the dawn of rock criticism." --Billboard"For Richard Goldstein, writing about music was a lifeline. The utopian energies of rock provided a window through which he could glimpse a very different kind of future being born. And he recognized instinctively that this new music required a new kind of writing to comprehend it. So he invented it . . . Much of the most riveting material in the book centers on the connection he made with some of the most brilliant and vulnerable of the era's artists: Brian Wilson, Jim Morrison, John Lennon, Janis Joplin. Goldstein reminds us of a time when the relationship between a musician and her fans was personal, even intimate." --Los Angeles Times"Goldstein has written a witty, insightful, and at times self-lacerating, memoir . . . [of his] experience as rock's most deeply embedded chronicler." --New York Daily News"A deeply felt and compelling portrait of an age that indelibly marked everyone who took part in it. Indispensable for understanding the culture of the '60s and the music that was at its heart." --Kirkus Reviews"Goldstein was in the right place at the right time, as he explains in this entertaining music memoir. [His] confessional tone gives significant warmth to the book, encouraging the reader to settle in as Goldstein recalls a tumultuous culture with humility and a healthy perspective." --Publishers Weekly"What happened to the revolution of the '60's? . . . Richard Goldstein may not be the first person to try to answer that question, but so far he is the most eloquent . . . In Another Little Piece of My Heart are some of the best explanations of how and why rock became the social force it is." --Examiner.com"Richard Goldstein's memoir took another little piece of my own heart. It's shrewdly observed, vividly written, steadily thoughtful, and above all honest about the exhilaration and fear that flourished in a time of giddy reinvention." --Todd Gitlin, author of THE SIXTIES: YEARS OF HOPE, DAYS OF RAGE"In silver boots, with flowing hair, Richard Goldstein strode through the 1960s like a hero in a picaresque adventure. He pioneered the new form of rock criticism; reported from the front lines of progressive politics and the counterculture; and, most of all, thoroughly lived the changes that revolutionary era wrought. This memoir provides unique views of some of the time's most colorful figures, including Janis Joplin, Jim Morrison, Susan Sontag, and Andy Warhol. But most of all, it shows us how one electric consciousness--Goldstein's own--emerged and evolved as America itself became new." --Ann Powers, author of WEIRD LIKE US: MY BOHEMIAN AMERICA and TORI AMOS: PIECE BY PIECE

Ask a Question About this Product More...
Write your question below:
Look for similar items by category
How Fishpond Works
Fishpond works with suppliers all over the world to bring you a huge selection of products, really great prices, and delivery included on over 25 million products that we sell. We do our best every day to make Fishpond an awesome place for customers to shop and get what they want — all at the best prices online.
Webmasters, Bloggers & Website Owners
You can earn a 8% commission by selling Another Little Piece of My Heart: My Life of Rock and Revolution in the '60s on your website. It's easy to get started - we will give you example code. After you're set-up, your website can earn you money while you work, play or even sleep! You should start right now!
Authors / Publishers
Are you the Author or Publisher of a book? Or the manufacturer of one of the millions of products that we sell. You can improve sales and grow your revenue by submitting additional information on this title. The better the information we have about a product, the more we will sell!
Item ships from and is sold by Fishpond.com, Inc.
Back to top