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Britain and the Greek Colonels
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Table of Contents

Introduction Chapter 1: The Labour government's policy towards the Colonels, 1967-68: Setting the tone The first traces 1967: A coup, a war and a conference Trouble in Cyprus Royal blues 1968: 'Business as usual' International dimension Chapter 2: The Labour government's policy towards the Colonels, 1969-70: a 'new era of relations' 1969: Council of Europe vs. NATO The Kotronis case 1970: 'The pendulum is swinging too wide for comfort' A note on Cyprus Chapter 3: The Conservative government's policy towards the Colonels, 1970: continuity vs. change 'Painful dilemmas' A Mediterranean 'powder keg' Troubled waters 'As much business as possible' Chapter 4: The Conservative government's policy towards the Colonels, 1971: messages, meetings and visits Extremists and 'policy of scold' The bridge Papadopoulos' doubts reappear The quest for a new spirit in relations Chapter 5: The Conservative government's policy towards the Colonels, 1972: towards a new direction? An inconclusive year Beware of Greeks bearing gifts Pragmatism prevails Chapter 6: The Conservative government's policy towards the Colonels, 1973: overtaken by events 'Europeanisation' of Anglo-Greek relations The three epochs of relations Recognition unbound The 'referendum' Chapter 7: The Conservatives, the experiment that failed, and the hardliners coup, September-December 1973 To encourage or not to encourage The 'invisible dictator' and the 'Greek Calends' The effects of anti-Americanism Chapter 8: Conservatives, Labour and the junta, 1974: the endgame Taking the heat The US card 'A proper working relationship' Diplomacy over the Aegean Cyprus Endgame Conclusion Appendix Notes Bibliography Index

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At the apex of Cold War tension, an alliance of Greek military leaders seized power in Athens. Seven years of political repression followed,yet,as Cold War allies, the Greek colonels had continued international support - especially from Britain. In this book Nafpliotis considers why.

About the Author

Dr Alexandros Nafpliotis is a Visiting Fellow at the London School of Economics and Political Science, where he was awarded his PhD in International History.

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