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Home » Books » Nonfiction » Education » Teaching Methods » Reading

Disrupting Thinking

Why How We Read Matters

By Kylene Beers, Robert E. Probst

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Format: Paperback, 176 pages
Published In: United States, 01 April 2017
In their hit books Notice and Note and Reading Nonfiction, Kylene Beers and Bob Probst showed teachers how to help students become close readers. Now, in Disrupting Thinking they take teachers a step further and discuss an on-going problem: lack of engagement with reading. They explain that all too often, no matter the strategy shared with students, too many students remain disengaged and reluctant readers. The problem, they suggest, is that we have misrepresented to students why we read and how we ought to approach any text - fiction or nonfiction. With their hallmark humor and their appreciated practicality, Beers and Probst present a vision of what reading and what education across all the grades could be. Hands-on-strategies make it applicable right away for the classroom teacher, and turn-and-talk discussion points make it a guidebook for school-wide conversations. In particular, they share new strategies and ideas for helping classroom teachers: --Create engagement and relevance --Encourage responsive and responsible reading --Deepen comprehension --Develop lifelong reading habits "We think it's time we finally do become a nation of readers, and we know it's time students learn to tell fake news from real news. It's time we help students understand why how they read is so important," explain Beers and Probst. "Disrupting Thinking is, at its heart, an exploration of how we help students become the reader who does so much more than decode, recall, or choose the correct answer from a multiple-choice list. This book shows us how to help students become the critical thinkers our nation needs them to be."

About the Author

Kylene Beers is an award-winning educator and is the author of When Kids Can't Read: What Teachers Can Do, Notice and Note: Strategies for Close Reading, Adolescent Literacy: Turning Promise into Practice, and Elements of Literature, the literature textbook read by the majority of middle school and high school students across the US. She began her teaching career in 1979 in the Alief School District, outside of Houston. Texas. Since then, she has become an internationally-known and respected authority in literacy education. Beers works tirelessly to help parents, teachers, and national policy makers understand how to best help struggling readers. In 2008-2009, she served as President of the National Council of Teachers of English and in 2011 she received an NCTE Leadership Award. She has served as a consultant to the National Governor's Association Education Committee, was the editor of the national literacy journal Voices from the Middle, taught in the College of Education at the University of Houston, held a reading research position in the Comer School Development Program at Yale University School of Medicine, and has most recently served as the Senior Reading Advisor to the Reading and Writing Project at Teachers College, Columbia University. Robert Probst, Ed.D., is an author and consultant to schools nationally and internationally. He speaks to administrators and teachers on literacy improvement, particularly issues surrounding struggling readers and meeting standards. Bob is Professor Emeritus of English Education at Georgia State University and has served as a research fellow for Florida International University. He has served as a member on the Conference on English Board of Directors, an NCTE journal columnist, and a member of the NCTE Commission on Reading. In 2004 he was awarded the NCTE Exemplary Leadership Award presented by the Conference on English Leadership.

Reviews

"I only wish that this book would be as popular in schools as Beers previous book was. Unfortunately, the education industry does not put priority on personal meaning in learning, so I think that this is a book that will have to be pushed out by individual teachers and leaders in schools, as well as involved parents. Within the first couple of chapters, Beers sets out why reading even matters- beyond the basic ability to find answers in text. After all, the best readers are usually ones that were read to as children, who saw their own parents or other family members reading for pleasure, and who read for pleasure themselves. And why do they read for pleasure? Because reading has meaning beyond their test scores. Going further, Beers also reminds us that contemporary careers and careers of the future do not want employees that can just repeat back information; they want employees that can make meaning out of what they read, make connections, and create their own ideas from what they have read.This is an enjoyable read for teachers, school leaders, and parents alike. I especially like it as motivational summer reading for teachers that are getting ready to return to school." --Mom to 2 BoysProvided via Amazon Vine "This honestly reminds me of things like why children hate reading and schools killing the love of reading, both the subject and titles of articles and discussions in education. As an English teacher who hates to write, but loves to read, this helps me feel better about the process. I love diving into a new book and sharing it with my students. I honestly got started writing book reviews because my students would see me reading something and immediately ask to read it next. It got to the point where I couldn't remember who was next and what that particular book was about because I had moved on to something new. Writing little book reviews on my classroom webpage and having a wait list made it easier for me to keep track. Knowing that we read for pleasure far more often than we read for any particular literary device or testing strategy is far more important for building lifelong literacy. I love that Beers addresses this and focuses on talking about the relationship of book and reader to engage in comprehension. Trying to figure out motivations and connections to the literature helps me connect and I have always wanted to share that with my students. I love that there are books out there that make me feel validated and can easily be shown to other parents or teachers to stress this importance." --Jennifer MillerProvided via Amazon Vine "If you haven't read anything by the dynamic duo Bob Probst and Kylene Beers and you are a teacher, you must! Their collaborative writing is highly readable, self-deprecating, witty, and on point. But don't be sidetracked by the entertaining repartee: their ideas about teaching are powerful, disruptive, and do-able. Don't think the double entendre of the book's title isn't intentional. While they propose and illustrate tangible ways in which we can disrupt the thinking of our students while reading (or prompt students out of what we thought were nonthinking stupors--Beers and Probst are passionately clear that we're wrong on that count), the duo is intentionally disrupting modern groupthink about teaching. If you only read 3 professional books this summer, make them: 1) Disrupting Thinking, 2) Notice and Note, and 3) Reading Nonfiction (in that order). Yes, like Star Wars, the third book in the series is really where it all begins. Disrupting Thinking outlines the philosophical underpinnings of their Notice and Note strategies. Without an understanding and willingness to embrace the philosophy behind Notice and Note, the signposts will be little more than another set of isolated reading strategies. Trust me, I taught the Nonfiction Notice and Note strategies as isolated reading strategies the first time (I know, I know, the book is clear on not doing that, but my role was to teach demonstration lessons rather than a daily core class). Like any isolated strategy, it doesn't work; kids won't and/or can't transfer their learning. I thought my flaw was a lack of text complexity. I taught the strategies but then students never needed to use them because they understood the texts without them. After reading "Disrupting Thinking," I understood that the attitude toward reading has to be in place for the Notice and Note signposts to be useful. In other words, students have to CARE enough about the text to use the strategies to figure it out. Disrupting Thinking only has one real strategy, and it is deceptively simple and powerful to the core. They call it: BHH (Book * Head * Heart). It can be taught at any level as a mindset for reading: What does the book say? What am I thinking as I read? What's in my heart while I read? (my paraphase, not theirs) The revolutionary idea is that we have to approach reading as something that changes us. When we teach our students to anticipate that what they read will change them one page at a time, then everything about how they read and how we teach reading changes, too. Simple, right? But how many teachers are out there teaching reading as anticipating change? Yet how many teachers out there read to be changed themselves? TONS. So our job is to come at reading with our students the way we do and make it matter. Somehow this simple yet powerful idea resonated with me in a way that all the book love authors have not. It's more tangible and more realistic than sharing your love of reading. They've pinpointed WHY we love reading: because it changes us. Now just because you've read my sad little synopsis, don't assume you can pass up this book. To circle back, Beers and Probst are incredible authors; their book comes with video links that I haven't even delved into yet, and you need to hear it from the two of them for yourself. You'll learn much more along the way, such as their take on recent education and reading debates, authors they look to, sample conversations to help imagine using the strategy in class, lovely sample anchor charts, etc. Is this book going to give you 24 lesson plans like Notice and Note? No. Is this book going to make those 24 lesson plans work? Yes. Get it, read it, and give it to a colleague to read, too." --JulieProvided via Amazon Vine "We need students who can do more than answer questions. Tomorrow's leaders need to be able to ASK questions. This is an excellent book for all teachers whether they teach reading, language arts, or science or history. Whether they teach elementary, middle, high school or college, or at home - EVERYONE who is around children needs to read this book. It is short but powerful. I have spent over 30 years in education, and I have taught every level from pre-school through university, and this book brought me back to the WHY and HOW of teaching. It is short and easy to understand for non-teachers. As an educator it reminded me of the good things we do in teaching, but stated in their research that all of this has bee set aside to focus on numbers and passing tests - the bane of a real educator's life. Children start out loving books and reading, but by middle school that hate reading because educators are just having them study vocabulary, answer questions, and nothing more. Most schools have taken away quiet or silent sustained reading, when research shows that it works and is needed. At the same time, many schools still do round-robin reading when research shows that it does NOT work. What works: students must be given choice in what to read, we must increase the amount they read, they must be encouraged to read aloud to a partner or parent, we must teach questioning strategies and model that process, and we MUST let go of the silent classroom and encourage students to talk about their reading with other students. Many teachers believe a quiet classroom is one that is in control, but our students need to talk to each other about their reading and their work. Letting go is a critical skill for educators in this fluid and rapidly changing world. Reading builds the following: knowledge, improves overall achievement, increases overall motivation, increases vocabulary, improves writing, build background knowledge, improves understanding of text structures, develops empathy, and develops personal identity.Please get this little book, read it, then apply the ideas to the children in your life or classroom. Please." --Texas RoseProvided via Amazon Vine "Beers and Probst tackle one of teachers' greatest challenges: student apathy. They show us not only how to "teach struggling readers but how to teach readers to struggle." And then they go the next step and show us how to turn the apathetic reader into a lifetime reader. And for both, we are grateful." -- Danny Brassel, Ph.D., consultant and author. Author of The Lazy Readers' Book Club "We're living in a world of social media and fake news have the potential to shape who we are and what we believe. Through the strategies presented in Disrupting Thinking, teachers see clearly how to help students become active participants in constructing meaning, as they respond, question, and challenge, so that in the end they become more responsible citizens in our world." -- Mindy Hoffar, All Write Consortium Director "Disrupting Thinking is one of the best books I've read about the power of books to disrupt complacency and promote change and the role teachers play in that disruption. Skillfully, these authors address the continuum of education K-12, making this book ideal for colleagues to read and share horizontally and vertically across grade levels." -- Sarah Mulhern Gross, English teacher at High Technology High School, contributor to The NY Times Learning Network -The beauty of this book is that in advocating for purposeful instruction that helps students become responsive, responsible, compassionate readers, it creates a vision for how teachers can help students change the world.- -- Jan Burkins & Kim Yaris, Authors of Who's Doing the Work: How to Say Less So Readers Can Do More -This is THE book we need most right now as we challenge our students to become purposeful readers who question and challenge texts in order to be open to the perspectives and possibilities that they present. It is a rallying cry that reminds us that teaching is about so much more than raising test scores. Beers and Probst explain relevance in a way that changes everything I will do tomorrow.- -- Sara Kajder, Ph.D., Author of Adolescents and Digital Literacies and Bringing the Outside In: Visual Ways to Engage Reluctant Readers -Kylene and Bob brilliantly explain the tragedy of disconnected reading, where students only read to complete a task, thereby trampling the joy of chasing after a story or an idea. They explain what educators can do to disrupt this trend, encourage classroom talk, and nurture lifelong readers, who in turn will make up an informed citizenry.- -- Sarah Holbrook, Poet and Educator, Author of Practical Poetry and High Impact Writing Clinics with co-author Michael Salinger -Beers and Probst tackle one of teachers' greatest challenges: student apathy. They show us not only how to -teach struggling readers but how to teach readers to struggle.- And then they go the next step and show us how to turn the apathetic reader into a lifetime reader. And for both, we are grateful.- -- Danny Brassel, Ph.D., consultant and author. Author of The Lazy Readers' Book Club -Disrupting Thinking is one of the best books I've read about the power of books to disrupt complacency and promote change and the role teachers play in that disruption. Skillfully, these authors address the continuum of education K-12, making this book ideal for colleagues to read and share horizontally and vertically across grade levels.- -- Sarah Mulhern Gross, English teacher at High Technology High School, contributor to The NY Times Learning Network "The beauty of this book is that in advocating for purposeful instruction that helps students become responsive, responsible, compassionate readers, it creates a vision for how teachers can help students change the world." -- Jan Burkins & Kim Yaris, Authors of Who's Doing the Work: How to Say Less So Readers Can Do More "This is THE book we need most right now as we challenge our students to become purposeful readers who question and challenge texts in order to be open to the perspectives and possibilities that they present. It is a rallying cry that reminds us that teaching is about so much more than raising test scores. Beers and Probst explain relevance in a way that changes everything I will do tomorrow." -- Sara Kajder, Ph.D., Author of Adolescents and Digital Literacies and Bringing the Outside In: Visual Ways to Engage Reluctant Readers "As always, when I read Kylene and Bob's words, I'm already nodding and nodding and nodding--'til my neck starts hurting. How is it that they always ask just the right questions and pinpoint what needs to be addressed so exactly?" -- Allison Jackson, 3rd Grade Teacher, Waggoner Elementary School, Tempe, AZ "A timely and critically important must-read for all who care about our children's future as informed, engaged, and compassionate citizens. This book reaches deeply into our hearts and minds as it disrupts our thinking about what the power of reading really means and where it begins--in our classrooms." -- Gail Westbrook, Elementary Literacy Specialist, Evergreen Public Schools, Vancouver, WA "Kylene and Bob brilliantly explain the tragedy of disconnected reading, where students only read to complete a task, thereby trampling the joy of chasing after a story or an idea. They explain what educators can do to disrupt this trend, encourage classroom talk, and nurture lifelong readers, who in turn will make up an informed citizenry." -- Sarah Holbrook, Poet and Educator, Author of Practical Poetry and High Impact Writing Clinics with co-author Michael Salinger

EAN: 9781338132908
ISBN: 1338132903
Publisher: Scholastic Teaching Resources
Dimensions: 22.86 x 18.75 x 2.54 centimetres (0.25 kg)
Age Range: 5-9 years
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