Now Australia's Biggest Toy Shop

We won't be beaten by anyone. Guaranteed

Eating the Sun
By

Rating

Product Description
Product Details

Promotional Information

'Eating the Sun' is the story of the discovery of a miracle: the source of life itself. From the intricacies of its molecular processes to the beauty of the nature that it supports, 'Eating the Sun' is a wondering tribute to the extraordinary process that has allowed plants to power the earth for billions of years. Photosynthesis is the most mundane of miracles. It surrounds us in our gardens and parks and countryside; even our cityscapes are shot through with trees. It makes nature green - the signature of the pigments with which plants harvest the sun; wherever nature offers us greenery, the molecular machinery of photosynthesis is making oxygen, energy and organic matter from the raw material of sunlight, water and carbon dioxide. We rarely give the green machinery that brings about this transformation much thought, and few of us understand its beautifully honed mechanisms. But we are dimly aware that those photosynthetic mechanisms are the basis of our lives twice over: the ultimate source of all our food and the ultimate source of every breath we take. 'Eating the Sun' will foster and enrich that awareness. And by connecting aspects of photosynthesis that are vital to our lives, to the crucial role its molecular mechanisms have played through more than two billion years of the earth's history, 'Eating the Sun' will change the way the reader sees the world. / The extraordinary account of the photosynthesis miracle and how it has worked to create life on our planet for over 2 billion years. / 'Eating the Sun' will provoke a new understanding and awareness of this crucial life-giving phenomenon and change how we view the planet. / Oliver Morton is the author of the much-praised 'Mapping Mars' which was shortlisted for the Guardian First Book Award. / Competition: Robert Macfarland, Roger Deakin, Richard Mabey

About the Author

Oliver Morton is a science writer and journalist. He has written extensively for New Scientist, Nature and a range of national broadsheets.

Reviews

The cycle of photosynthesis is the cycle of life, says science journalist Morton (Mapping Mars). Green leaves trap sunlight and use it to absorb carbon dioxide from the air and emit life-giving oxygen in its place. Indeed, plants likely created Earth's life-friendly oxygen- and nitrogen-rich biosphere. In the first part, Morton, chief news and features editor of the leading science journal, Nature, traces scientists' quest to understand how photosynthesis works at the molecular level. In part two, Morton addresses evidence of how plants may have kick-started the complex life cycle on Earth. The book's final part considers photosynthesis in relation to global warming, for, he says, the Earth's plant-based balance of carbon dioxide and oxygen is broken: in burning vast amounts of fossil fuels, we are emitting more carbon dioxide than the plants can absorb. But Morton also explores the possibility that our understanding of photosynthesis might be harnessed to regain that balance. Readers should persevere through (or skim) the more technical discussions in the first part, for what follows is a vast, elegant synthesis of biology, physics and environmental science that can inform our discussions of urgent issues. (Nov. 4) Copyright 2008 Reed Business Information.

'A fascinating and important book' Ian McEwan 'Morton is as compelling and eloquent in describing the evolution of landscape as he is at describing the evolution of life itself. This book will, quite literally, change the way you see the world' Sunday Telegraph 'Everything you could possibly want from a popular science book. There is wonder here, and intellectual excitement; clear explanation and lyrical writing; and much new insight into how the world works, linking the very small and very large.' Jon Turney, Independent 'An informative, fascinating and thought-provoking read.' Sunday Times 'A fascinating read.' Independent 'When you are done with this book you will see the world differently and understand it better. Going directly to the most important question of our time -- the origin of the carbon/climate crisis -- and delving deeply into it, Eating the Sun transcends science writing as we usually think of it.' Kim Stanley Robinson '"Eating the Sun" could not be more timely, and firmly establishes Oliver Morton as one of the world's finest science writers.' Steven Shapin Praise for 'Mapping Mars': 'A wonderful work of intellectual history and a permanent addition to the Mars bookshelf.' Kim Stanley Robinson, author of the 'Red Mars' trilogy and 'The Years of Rice and Salt' 'Splendid ! the best factual book on Mars that money can buy.' New Scientist 'A remarkable book ! to read this book is to become infected with a fascination which I hadn't realised Mars held.' James Hamilton-Patersons, London Review of Books 'A beautifully intelligent meditation on place, and on the paradoxes of place that apply to a place like Mars!it will be around for a long time to come.' Francis Spufford, Evening Standard

Award-winning science journalist Morton's (Mapping Mars) latest book is a beautiful example of what science writing can achieve and serves as a unique contribution to the public understanding of a research field underrepresented in popular science literature. Providing textbook details of the photochemical and enzymatic events that take place in the chloroplast to produce photosynthesis, Morton writes in clear and graceful prose, augmenting his well-researched facts by telling the fascinating backstory of the research scientists who have added to our understanding of a biological process that is so crucial to sustaining life on Earth. Morton brings to light the sometimes fractious and yet interdisciplinary collaborative groups that worked together across an international landscape to elucidate the mechanisms of photosynthesis. Moving from the molecular level, he explores the impact of plants on our planet, describing paleobotanical research, exobiology, and Lovelock's Gaian view of Earth. Tying all this together, a final chapter considers the impact of our reliance on fossil fuel, derived from early photosynthesizing plants, on our planet. Strongly recommended for large public libraries and academic libraries.-Sara Rutter, Univ. of Hawaii at Manoa Lib., Honolulu Copyright 2008 Reed Business Information.

Ask a Question About this Product More...
Write your question below:
Look for similar items by category
Home » Books » Science » Environment
Home » Books » Science » Biology » Ecology
Home » Books » Science » Nature » Ecology
Home » Books » Science » Biology » Botany
How Fishpond Works
Fishpond works with suppliers all over the world to bring you a huge selection of products, really great prices, and delivery included on over 25 million products that we sell. We do our best every day to make Fishpond an awesome place for customers to shop and get what they want — all at the best prices online.
Webmasters, Bloggers & Website Owners
You can earn a 5% commission by selling Eating the Sun: How Plants Power the Planet on your website. It's easy to get started - we will give you example code. After you're set-up, your website can earn you money while you work, play or even sleep! You should start right now!
Authors / Publishers
Are you the Author or Publisher of a book? Or the manufacturer of one of the millions of products that we sell. You can improve sales and grow your revenue by submitting additional information on this title. The better the information we have about a product, the more we will sell!
Item ships from and is sold by Fishpond World Ltd.
Back to top