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Geographical Thought
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Table of Contents

1. Geographies of Empire: The Imperial Tradition
Introduction
Empire, imperialism and colonialism
Defining terms
Portuguese and Spanish empires
British Empire
The institionalisation of geography
From 'fabulous' to 'militant' geography
The Royal Geographical Society
The Societe Geographie de Paris (SGP)
Environmental determinism: climate and race
Environmental determinism and the Panama Canal
Criticisms and dissent
Conclusions2. The Quantitative Revolution
Introduction
The origins of the quantitative revolution
Political reasons
The quantitative revolution
Positivism
The assumption of neutrality
The absence of politics
The uniformity of human subjects
The legacy of the quantitative revolution
Conclusions3. Humanistic Geographies
Introduction
Humanistic geography and the challenge to positivism
Extension
Revision
Phenomenology and existentialism
Phenomenology
Existentialism
Humanistic geography in focus: the work of Yi-Fu Tuan
The challenge to humanism
Structure agency
Feminist geography
Conclusions4. Marxist Radical Geographies
Introduction
Karl Marx
Key Marxist ideas
Historical materialism
The economic base
The superstructure
Ruling ideas
Class struggle
Class consciousness
Commodity fetishism
Radical geography
The 'turn' to Marxism
Marxist geography and spatial constructions of class
The political ecology of Marxism
The limits of Marxism
Future horizons
Conclusions5. Human Geography and the Cultural Turn
Introduction
The meaning of culture
Early traditions of cultural geography
New maps of meaning: British Cultural Studies
Working-class histories
Youth subcultures
Race, ethnicity and nationalism
Popular culture and media theory
The new cultural geography
Landscape as text
The cultural turn from the margins to the centre
Institutionalising cultural geography
Recasting political and economic geography through the cultural turn
Rematerialising culture, reclaiming the social
Conclusions6. Feminist Geographies
Introduction
First and second wave feminism
First wave feminism
Second wave feminism
Political perspectives of feminism
Radical feminism
Socialist feminists
Establishing feminist geography
Making women visible
Absence from departments and publications
The enduring masculinist rationality of geography
Divergent strategies of resistance
Practicing feminist geography
Qualitative methods
Research position
Collaborative practice
Rethinking gender7. Geographies of Sexuality
Introduction
Engaging with the object of research
Heteronormativity
Psychoanalysis: Sigmund Freud
Discursive: Michel Foucault
Performativity: Judith Butler
Geographies of sexuality
Mapping sexuality
Sexuality and space
Heterosexuality
The politics of sexuality
The politics of the discipline
Sexual citizenship
Conclusions8. Geography, Ethnicity and Racialisation
Introduction
The idea of race
Cultural racisims
Geography and the shadow of empire
Mapping and monitoring race
Urban cultural geographies of 'race'
Geographies of rural racism
Turning to whiteness
Anti-racist geographies: subverting a white discipline
Conclusions9. Post-modern Geographies
Introduction
Modernism and modernity
Post-modernity: an historical moment
Post-modernism: a critical practice
Jean-Francois Lyotard grand narratives
Michel Foucault discourse and power
Jacques Derrida deconstruction
Jean Baudrillard simulation, simulacra and hyper-reality
Post-modernism: a stylistic phenomena
Art, commercialism and the cult of celebrity
Architecture and the built environment
Geographical engagements: theory, method and practice
Theory
Method
Practice
Post-modern criticisms
Conclusions

10. Critical Geo-politics
Introduction
Origins of geo-politics
Mackinder
Haushofer
Bowman
Decline of geo-politics
Critical geo-politics
Political context
Formal, practical and popular geo-politics
Beyond critical geo-politics
Anti-geo-politics
Normative geo-politics
Conclusions11. Post-colonial Geographies and the Colonial Present
Introduction
Understanding post-colonialism
Post-colonial geographies
Imaginative geographies: the work of Edward Said
Critiquing Orientalism
Splitting race objects: the work of Frantz Fanon
Blackness, whiteness and psychoanalysis
Undoing race
Geographical contribution
Hybridity and the third space: the work of Homi Bhabha
Colonial stereotypes
Cultural hybridity
Critiquing hybridity
Doing post-colonial geographies
Visual methods and post-colonial spectacle
Post-colonial economic geographies
Conclusions12. Emotions, Embodiment and Lived Geographies
Introduction
A crisis of representation? Cultural geography and non-representational theory
Understanding affect
Towards 'more-than-representational-' geographies
Reinvigorating landscape
The problem of performance
Conclusions

1 Geographies of Empire: The Imperial Tradition 1.1 Introduction 1.2 Empire, imperialism and colonialism 1.2.1 Defining terms 1.2.2 Portuguese and Spanish empires 1.2.3 British Empire 1.3 The institionalisation of geography 1.3.1 From fabulous' to militant' geography 1.3.2 The Royal Geographical Society 1.3.3 The Societe Geographie de Paris (SGP) 1.4 Environmental determinism: climate and race 1.4.1 Environmental determinism and the Panama Canal 1.5 Criticisms and dissent 1.6 Conclusions 2 The Quantitative Revolution 2.1 Introduction 2.2 The origins of the quantitative revolution 2.2.1 Political reasons 2.3 The quantitative revolution 2.3.1 Positivism 2.3.2 The assumption of neutrality 2.3.3 The absence of politics 2.3.4 The uniformity of human subjects 2.4 The legacy of the quantitative revolution 2.5 Conclusions 3 Humanistic Geographies 3.1 Introduction 3.2 Humanistic geography and the challenge to positivism 3.2.1 Extension 3.2.2 Revision 3.3 Phenomenology and existentialism 3.3.1 Phenomenology 3.3.2 Existentialism 3.4 Humanistic geography in focus: the work of Yi-Fu Tuan 3.5 The challenge to humanism 3.5.1 Structure agency 3.5.2 Feminist geography 3.6 Conclusions 4 Marxist Radical Geographies 4.1 Introduction 4.2 Karl Marx 4.3 Key Marxist ideas 4.3.1 Historical materialism 4.3.2 The economic base 4.3.3 The superstructure 4.3.4 Ruling ideas 4.3.5 Class struggle 4.3.6 Class consciousness 4.3.7 Commodity fetishism 4.4 Radical geography 4.5 The turn' to Marxism 4.6 Marxist geography and spatial constructions of class 4.7 The political ecology of Marxism 4.8 The limits of Marxism 4.9 Future horizons 4.10 Conclusions 5 Human Geography and the Cultural Turn 5.1 Introduction 5.2 The meaning of culture 5.3 Early traditions of cultural geography 5.4 New maps of meaning: British Cultural Studies 5.4.1 Working-class histories 5.4.2 Youth subcultures 5.4.3 Race, ethnicity and nationalism 5.4.4 Popular culture and media theory 5.5 The new cultural geography 5.5.1 Landscape as text 5.6 The cultural turn from the margins to the centre 5.6.1 Institutionalising cultural geography 5.6.2 Recasting political and economic geography through the cultural turn 5.7 Rematerialising culture, reclaiming the social 5.8 Conclusions 6 Feminist Geographies 6.1 Introduction 6.2 First and second wave feminism 6.2.1 First wave feminism 6.2.2 Second wave feminism 6.3 Political perspectives of feminism 6.3.1 Radical feminism 6.3.2 Socialist feminists 6.4 Establishing feminist geography 6.4.1 Making women visible 6.4.2 Absence from departments and publications 6.4.3 The enduring masculinist rationality of geography 6.4.4 Divergent strategies of resistance 6.5 Practicing feminist geography 6.5.1 Qualitative methods 6.5.2 Research position 6.5.3 Collaborative practice 6.6 Rethinking gender 7 Geographies of Sexuality 7.1 Introduction 7.2 Engaging with the object of research 7.3 Heteronormativity 7.3.1 Psychoanalysis: Sigmund Freud 7.3.2 Discursive: Michel Foucault 7.3.3 Performativity: Judith Butler 7.4 Geographies of sexuality 7.4.1 Mapping sexuality 7.4.2 Sexuality and space 7.4.3 Heterosexuality 7.5 The politics of sexuality 7.5.1 The politics of the discipline 7.5.2 Sexual citizenship 7.6 Conclusions 8 Geography, Ethnicity and Racialisation 8.1 Introduction 8.2 The idea of race 8.3 Cultural racisims 8.4 Geography and the shadow of empire 8.5 Mapping and monitoring race 8.6 Urban cultural geographies of race' 8.7 Geographies of rural racism 8.8 Turning to whiteness 8.9 Anti-racist geographies: subverting a white discipline 8.10 Conclusions 9 Post-modern Geographies 9.1 Introduction 9.2 Modernism and modernity 9.3 Post-modernity: an historical moment 9.4 Post-modernism: a critical practice 9.4.1 Jean-Francois Lyotard grand narratives 9.4.2 Michel Foucault discourse and power 9.4.3 Jacques Derrida deconstruction 9.4.4 Jean Baudrillard simulation, simulacra and hyper-reality 9.5 Post-modernism: a stylistic phenomena 9.5.1 Art, commercialism and the cult of celebrity 9.5.2 Architecture and the built environment 9.6. Geop;Theory 9.6.2 Method 9.6.3 Practice 9.7 Post-modern criticisms 9.8 Conclusions 10 Critical Geo-politics 10.1 Introduction 10.2 Origins of geo-politics 10.2.1 Mackinder 10.2.2 Haushofer 10.2.3 Bowman 10.2.4 Decline of geo-politics 10.3 Critical geo-politics 10.3.1 Political context 10.4 Formal, practical and popular geo-politics 10.5 Beyond critical geo-politics 10.5.1 Anti-geo-politics 10.5.2 Normative geo-politics 10.6 Conclusions 11 Post-colonial Geographies and the Colonial Present 11.1 Introduction 11.2 Understanding post-colonialism 11.3 Post-colonial geographies 11.4 Imaginative geographies: the work of Edward Said 11.4.1 Critiquing Orientalism 11.5 Splitting race objects: the work of Frantz Fanon 11.5.1 Blackness, whiteness and psychoanalysis 11.5.2 Undoing race 11.5.3 Geographical contribution 11.6 Hybridity and the third space: the work of Homi Bhabha 11.6.1 Colonial stereotypes 11.6.2 Cultural hybridity 11.6.3 Critiquing hybridity 11.7 Doing post-colonial geographies 11.7.1 Visual methods and post-colonial spectacle 11.7.2 Post-colonial economic geographies 11.8 Conclusions 12 Emotions, Embodiment and Lived Geographies 12.1 Introduction 12.2 A crisis of representation? Cultural geography and non-representational theory 12.3 Understanding affect 12.4 Towards more-than-representational- geographies 12.4.1 Reinvigorating landscape 12.5 The problem of performance 12.6 Conclusions

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Geographical Thought provides a clear and accessible introduction to the key ideas and figures in human geography.

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