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Illustrated Guide to Oakland

Walks, Drives, Excursions (Classic Reprint)

By Unknown Author

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Format: Paperback, 28 pages
Other Information: Illustrated
Published In: United States, 27 September 2015
Excerpt from Illustrated Guide to Oakland: Walks, Drives, Excursions Oakland, Maryland, is located on the main line of the Baltimore Ohio Railroad. It is in the extreme western end of the State, being twenty miles south of Pennsylvania and eight miles north and east of West Virginia. By rail Oakland is distant twelve hours from New York, ten hours from Philadelphia, seven hours from Baltimore, six hours from Washington, six hours from Pittsburg, five hours from Wheeling, eleven hours from Cincinnati, and fifteen hours from Chicago. Oakland is situated on a plateau about 2800 feet above sea level. This plateau extends from Altamont, summit of the railroad grade on the East, to Terra Alta, summit of the railroad grade on the West, a distance of twenty miles, the town of Oakland being midway between the two. The breezes sweep over this plateau, but the mountain ridges which border it break the force of high winds, and storms such as are common in low lands, are unknown. The air always is stirring and on the warmest days in summer there is a breeze. The singularly fine climate of Oakland - bracing, dry and soft air - is due not only to its elevation, but also to its location in the middle of this extensive plateau. Oakland is the county seat of Garrett County, the largest in area and smallest in population, per square mile, of the counties of Maryland. The town is regularly laid out, with streets running from north-east to south-west and from north-west to southeast. The railroad enters the town at the south-east, runs due north past the station and departs to the north-west, cutting the town in two with a diagonal line and giving the false impression that the streets were not laid out properly. The main streets are paved with brick or are macadamized. The side walks are of brick, stone or boards, generally the last. The little Youghiogheny river runs through the town in same direction as the railroad and empties into the big Youghiogheny river about a mile to the north-west. Another small stream comes from the north-east, passes under the main street in the very center of the town, and empties into the little Yough, as it is locally called. The hillsides upon which the houses are built dip towards these streams and there is natural drainage. Oakland drys up quickly after rain. The streets are lighted at night with arc electric lights and all the stores are equipped with incandescent electric lights, so the town is bright by night as well as by day. The sentiment in favor of law and order is ruling and Oakland is peaceful. Oakland has been a resort in summer of people from cities for many years - thirty or more. Residents and visitors are used to each other. People who come, usually remain several weeks or the whole season, as cottage life is the rule rather than the exception. The hotels and boarding houses have their guests also and these stay here longer than do summer people elsewhere. The reason is that people do not come to Oakland for the amusements they can have at almost every other place, but they come for the fresh, pure air, for rest, for out-of-door life, free from dust, noise and crowds. Oakland offers rest and quiet without isolation. A dozen or more families from cities regularly keep house in summer, finding it easy because the stores are good and supplies ample. Friends of theirs come to the boarding houses, hotels and cottages. There is a colony of summer people. Oakland in summer is given over to out-of-door life. From early spring to early summer there are trout to be caught in the mountain streams, later the bass come into the Youghiogheny River, and chub also, a fish not to be despised in cold mountain waters. Fishing has improved in recent years. There is, of course, not much shooting until fall, though woodcock occasionally are found. There are golf, tennis and baseball. Riding, driving and walking - because of the excellence of the roads and beauty of the scenery - are .
EAN: 9781332142361
ISBN: 1332142362
Publisher: Forgotten Books
Dimensions: 22.86 x 15.24 x 0.15 centimetres (0.05 kg)
Age Range: 15+ years
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