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Julius Caesar
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TEXT EDITORS Robert Ormsby received his PhD from the University of Toronto in 2005. Besides essays on Canadian performances of classical drama (Toronto Slavic Quarterly, May, 2003; Shakespeare Bulletin, Summer 2004), his publications include Descriptive Entries of Folger Library collection prompt-books for Coriolanus productions by John Philip Kemble, Samuel Phelps, and Henry Irving (The Shakespeare Collection) and a review of Shakespeare and the Force of Modern Performance by W.B. Worthen. (Renaissance Quarterly, Summer 2004). SERIES EDITORS Marie Macaisa spent twenty years in her first career: high tech. She has a BS in computer science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a MS in artificial intelligence from the University of Pennsylvania. She edited the first two books in the series, Romeo and Juliet and Othello, contributed the "Cast Speaks" essays, and is currently at work on the next set. Dominique Raccah is the founder, president and publisher of Sourcebooks. Born in Paris, France, she has a bachelor's degree in psychology and a master's in quantitative psychology from the University of Illinois. She also serves as series editor of Poetry Speaks and Poetry Speaks to Children. ADVISORY BOARD David Bevington is the Phyllis Fay Horton Distinguished Service Professor in the Humanities at the University of Chicago. A renowned text scholar, he has edited several Shakespeare editions including the Bantam Shakespeare in individual paperback volumes, The Complete Works of Shakespeare (Longman, 2003), and Troilus and Cressida (Arden, 1998). He teaches courses in Shakespeare, Renaissance Drama and Medieval Drama. Peter Holland is the McMeel Family Chair in Shakespeare Studies at the University of Notre Dame. One of the central figures in performance-oriented Shakespeare criticism, he has also edited many Shakespeare plays, including A Midsummer Night's Dream for the Oxford Shakespeare series. He is also general editor of Shakespeare Survey and co-general editor (with Stanley Wells) of Oxford Shakespeare Topics. Currently he is completing a book, Shakespeare on Film, and editing Coriolanus for the Arden 3rd series. ESSAYISTS Thomas Garvey has been acting, directing, or writing about Shakespeare for over two decades. A graduate of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, he studied acting and directing with the MIT Shakespeare Ensemble, where he played Hamlet, Jacques, Iago, and other roles, and directed All's Well The Ends Well and Twelfth Night. He has since directed and designed serveral other Shakespearean productions, as well as works by Chekov, Ibsen, Sophocles, Beckett, Moliere, and Shaw. Mr. Garvey currently writes on theatre for the Boston Globe and other publications. SERIES EDITORS Marie Macaisa spent twenty years in her first career: high tech. She has a BS in computer science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a MS in artificial intelligence from the University of Pennsylvania. She edited the first two books in the series, Romeo and Juliet and Othello, contributed the "Cast Speaks" essays, and is currently at work on the next set. Dominique Raccah is the founder, president and publisher of Sourcebooks. Born in Paris, France, she has a bachelor's degree in psychology and a master's in quantitative psychology from the University of Illinois. She also serves as series editor of Poetry Speaks and Poetry Speaks to Children. ADVISORY BOARD David Bevington is the Phyllis Fay Horton Distinguished Service Professor in the Humanities at the University of Chicago. A renowned text scholar, he has edited several Shakespeare editions including the Bantam Shakespeare in individual paperback volumes, The Complete Works of Shakespeare (Longman, 2003), and Troilus and Cressida (Arden, 1998). He teaches courses in Shakespeare, Renaissance Drama and Medieval Drama. Peter Holland is the McMeel Family Chair in Shakespeare Studies at the University of Notre Dame. One of the central figures in performance-oriented Shakespeare criticism, he has also edited many Shakespeare plays, including A Midsummer Night's Dream for the Oxford Shakespeare series. He is also general editor of Shakespeare Survey and co-general editor (with Stanley Wells) of Oxford Shakespeare Topics. Currently he is completing a book, Shakespeare on Film, and editing Coriolanus for the Arden 3rd series. ESSAYISTS Thomas Garvey has been acting, directing, or writing about Shakespeare for over two decades. A graduate of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, he studied acting and directing with the MIT Shakespeare Ensemble, where he played Hamlet, Jacques, Iago, and other roles, and directed All's Well The Ends Well and Twelfth Night. He has since directed and designed several other Shakespearean productions, as well as works by Chekov, Ibsen, Sophocles, Beckett, Moliere, and Shaw. Mr. Garvey currently writes on theatre for the Boston Globe and other publications. Jeffrey Horowitz is the founder and artistic director of Theatre for a New Audience (TFANA) in New York City. Founded in 1979, TFANA's mission is to help develop and vitalize the performance and study of Shakespeare and classic drama. TFANA's productions and artists have been recognized with many awards and nominations, including the Lortel, Drama Desk, Drama League, OBIE, and Tony. In 2001, TFANA became the first US theatre to be invited to bring a production of Shakespeare to the Royal Shakespeare Company (RSC). TFANA toured Cymbeline (directed by Bartlett Sher) to Stratford-upon-Avon, and in 2007, their Merchant of Venice featuring F. Murray Abraham will be featured as part of the RSC's Complete Works festival. Douglas Lanier is an associate professor of English at the University of New Hamsphire. He has written many essays on Shakepeare in popular culture, including "Shakescorp Noir" in Shakespeare Quarterly 53.2 (Summer 2002) and "Shakespeare on the Record" in The Blackwell Companion to Shakespeare in Performance (edited by Barbara Hodgdon and William Worthen, Blackwell, 2005). His book Shakespeare and Modern Popular Culture (Oxford University Press) was published in 2002. He is currently working on a book-length study of cultural stratification in early modern British theater. Andrew Wade was head of voice for the Royal Shakespeare Company from 1990 to 2003 and voice assistant director from 1987 to 1990. During this time he worked on 170 productions and with more than 80 directors. Along with Cicely Berry, Andrew recorded Working Shakespeare and the DVD series Voice and Shakespeare, and he was the verse consultant for the movie Shakespeare In Love. In 2000, he won a Bronze Award from the New York International Radio Festival for the series Lifespan, which he co-directed and devised. He works widely teaching, lecturing an coaching throughout the world.

Reviews

The latest in Yale's "Annotated Shakespeare" series are two of the old boy's greatest hits. Besides the scholarly texts, these include lists of suggested further reading, essays, and more. Fab for the price. Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

Gr 7 Up-In these additions to the series, characters are introduced with full-color illustrations accompanied by a play quotation revealing the essence of each cast member. Both adaptations use excerpts from Shakespeare's words paired with black-and-white art to dramatize the action. Although the books are categorized as manga, pages are read from front to back, left to right. Caesar is set in a contemporary world filled with cell phones and motorcycles. The artist's imagery, such as the serpent in Brutus's home and the puppets in Cassius's hands, adds depth and layers of meaning to the text. Stage directions, noted in boxes at the top of panels, help readers to follow the story. While the style of artwork appears "busy" for manga, the artist's rendition of faces accurately captures each character's feelings in this emotionally charged adaptation. Macbeth is set in a postapocalyptic world, with crumbling cities, alien beings who serve as "witches," and men with Charles Atlas-like bodies. Bold, dynamic male figures reinforce the notion of mutations in both body and emotion. The setting introduces some anachronisms. Sophisticated communication devices seem at odds with armor-clad riders carrying swords and traveling on horseback. Although segments of well-known speeches are included, the abridgment seems choppy. Numerous, briefly introduced characters and abrupt scene changes make it difficult to follow the story line. However, readers familiar with the play may appreciate this futuristic adaptation.-Barbara M. Moon, Suffolk Cooperative Library System, Bellport, NY Copyright 2009 Reed Business Information.

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