Absolutely Australia's Lowest Prices

We won't be beaten by anyone. Guaranteed

Machine Art, 1934
By

Rating
New or Used: $99.05
New or Used: $99.05

Product Description
Product Details

About the Author

Jennifer Jane Marshall is assistant professor of art history at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities.

Reviews

"[P]resents a compelling argument for "Machine Art" as an ideologically conservative response to the crises of the Depression economy--an attempt to represent technological society as not perpetually in chaotic flux but as approaching a perfect stasis. . . . Marshall's study is a masterful multidisciplinary example of the substantial rewards that often follow from an in-depth examination of a single, relatively limited event."
--Jeffrey L. Meikle "Winterthur Portfolio "
"The "Machine Art" exhibition is well known as definitive of the Museum of Modern Art's strenuous efforts, during its founding years, to promote 'pure modernism' as both an absolute aesthetic value and as central to American society in a time of turmoil. No other study takes us so deeply into the thinking of the two major progenitors: Philip Johnson and Alfred H. Barr Jr. Their unique mixture of plain pragmatism and dream-like imagining is subtly shown. An engaging host of minor characters emerge as this fascinating story is told. Just as interesting is the way in which the objects themselves, each of them a carefully designed embodiment of practical purposiveness, are presented as adding up to a new, modern and American standard of beauty--one that was, at the time, yet to be achieved in art itself. Marshall brilliantly brings out the ambition, the strengths, and the overreach, of this still resonant vision."
--Terry Smith, University of Pittsburgh
The "Machine Art" exhibition is well known as definitive of the Museum of Modern Art s strenuous efforts, during its founding years, to promote pure modernism as both an absolute aesthetic value and as central to American society in a time of turmoil. No other study takes us so deeply into the thinking of the two major progenitors: Philip Johnson and Alfred H. Barr Jr. Their unique mixture of plain pragmatism and dream-like imagining is subtly shown. An engaging host of minor characters emerge as this fascinating story is told. Just as interesting is the way in which the objects themselves, each of them a carefully designed embodiment of practical purposiveness, are presented as adding up to a new, modern and American standard of beauty one that was, at the time, yet to be achieved in art itself. Marshall brilliantly brings out the ambition, the strengths, and the overreach, of this still resonant vision.
--Terry Smith, University of Pittsburgh"
A lively, intelligent, and altogether magnificent book that sets a new standard for the integration of art history and thing theory in the American context. Marshall provides an indispensable reading of American modernism's entanglement with machinery and matter, opening new perspectives on the economic and philosophical crises of the Depression era.
--Jennifer L. Roberts, Harvard University"
This book is a stunning contribution to our deepening understanding of the multiple conceptual and cultural forces shaping American modernism. Marshall shows how these are grounded not simply in aesthetic and formal developments but in philosophical convictions whose impacts are played out across a wide spectrum of national life. In her masterfully concise account of the 1934 "Machine Art" exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art, we are guided through the anxious worlds of value and meaning as they were negotiated in the decades between the wars. Ranging from debates over currency, labor, and consumerism, to divisions among idealists and pragmatists, elites and populists, "Machine Art, 1934" is a richly satisfying case study whose lessons reach very far indeed.
--Angela Miller, Washington University in St. Louis"
[P]resents a compelling argument for "Machine Art" as an ideologically conservative response to the crises of the Depression economy an attempt to represent technological society as not perpetually in chaotic flux but as approaching a perfect stasis. . . . Marshall s study is a masterful multidisciplinary example of the substantial rewards that often follow from an in-depth examination of a single, relatively limited event.
--Jeffrey L. Meikle "Winterthur Portfolio ""
"The Machine Art exhibition is well known as definitive of the Museum of Modern Art's strenuous efforts, during its founding years, to promote 'pure modernism' as both an absolute aesthetic value and as central to American society in a time of turmoil. No other study takes us so deeply into the thinking of the two major progenitors: Philip Johnson and Alfred H. Barr Jr. Their unique mixture of plain pragmatism and dream-like imagining is subtly shown. An engaging host of minor characters emerge as this fascinating story is told. Just as interesting is the way in which the objects themselves, each of them a carefully designed embodiment of practical purposiveness, are presented as adding up to a new, modern and American standard of beauty--one that was, at the time, yet to be achieved in art itself. Marshall brilliantly brings out the ambition, the strengths, and the overreach, of this still resonant vision."
--Terry Smith, University of Pittsburgh
"A lively, intelligent, and altogether magnificent book that sets a new standard for the integration of art history and thing theory in the American context. Marshall provides an indispensable reading of American modernism's entanglement with machinery and matter, opening new perspectives on the economic and philosophical crises of the Depression era."
--Jennifer L. Roberts, Harvard University
"This book is a stunning contribution to our deepening understanding of the multiple conceptual and cultural forces shaping American modernism. Marshall shows how these are grounded not simply in aesthetic and formal developments but in philosophical convictions whose impacts are played out across a wide spectrum of national life. In her masterfully concise account of the 1934 Machine Art exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art, we are guided through the anxious worlds of value and meaning as they were negotiated in the decades between the wars. Ranging from debates over currency, labor, and consumerism, to divisions among idealists and pragmatists, elites and populists, Machine Art, 1934 is a richly satisfying case study whose lessons reach very far indeed."
--Angela Miller, Washington University in St. Louis
"[P]resents a compelling argument for Machine Art as an ideologically conservative response to the crises of the Depression economy--an attempt to represent technological society as not perpetually in chaotic flux but as approaching a perfect stasis. . . . Marshall's study is a masterful multidisciplinary example of the substantial rewards that often follow from an in-depth examination of a single, relatively limited event."
--Jeffrey L. Meikle "Winterthur Portfolio "

Ask a Question About this Product More...
Write your question below:
Look for similar items by category
People also searched for
How Fishpond Works
Fishpond works with suppliers all over the world to bring you a huge selection of products, really great prices, and delivery included on over 25 million products that we sell. We do our best every day to make Fishpond an awesome place for customers to shop and get what they want — all at the best prices online.
Webmasters, Bloggers & Website Owners
You can earn a 5% commission by selling Machine Art, 1934 on your website. It's easy to get started - we will give you example code. After you're set-up, your website can earn you money while you work, play or even sleep! You should start right now!
Authors / Publishers
Are you the Author or Publisher of a book? Or the manufacturer of one of the millions of products that we sell. You can improve sales and grow your revenue by submitting additional information on this title. The better the information we have about a product, the more we will sell!
Back to top