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Home » Books » Nonfiction » Politics » Freedom & Security » Civil Rights

Reconfiguring Citizenship

Social Exclusion and Diversity within Inclusive Citizenship Practices (Contemporary Social Work Studies)

By Mehmoona Moosa-Mitha, Lena Dominelli (Edited by), Dr. Lucy Jordan (Series edited by), Professor Patrick O'Leary (Series edited by)

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Format: Hardcover, 322 pages, Revised Edition
Other Information: Includes 1 b&w illustration
Published In: United Kingdom, 11 June 2014
Citizenship as a status assumes that all those encompassed by the term 'citizen' are included, albeit within the boundaries of the nation-state. Yet citizenship practices can be both inclusionary and exclusionary, with far-reaching ramifications for both nationals and non-nationals. This volume explores the concept of citizenship and its practices within particular contexts and nation-states to identify whether its claims to inclusivity are justified. This will show whether the exclusionary dimensions experienced by some citizens and non-citizens are linked to deficiencies in the concept, country-specific policies or how it is practised in different contexts. The interrogation of citizenship is important in a globalising world where crossing borders raises issues of diversity and how citizenship status is framed. This raises the issue of human rights and their protection within the nation-state for people whose lifestyles differ from the prevailing ones. Besides highlighting the importance of human rights and social justice as integral to citizenship, it affirms the role of the nation-state in safeguarding these matters. It does so by building on Indigenous peoples' insights about linking citizenship to connections to other people and the environment and arguing for the inalienability and portability of citizenship rights guaranteed collectively through international level agreements. These issues are of particular concern to social workers given that they must act in accordance with the principles of democracy, equality and empowerment. However, citizenship issues are often inadequately articulated in social work theory and practice. This book redresses this by providing social workers with insights, knowledge, values and skills about citizenship practices to enable them to work more effectively with those excluded from enjoying the full rights of citizenship in the nation-states in which they reside.

Table of Contents

Contents: Introduction, Lena Dominelli and Mehmoona Moosa-Mitha. Part I (Re)conceptualising Citizenship: Problematising concepts of citizenship and citizenship practices, Lena Dominelli; Exclusionary and inclusionary citizenship practices around faith-based communities, Mehmoona Moosa-Mitha; Spirituality, faith affiliations and indigenous peoplea (TM)s experiences of citizenship, Jacquie Green (Kundoqk). Part II Citizenship Practices in Diverse Settings: Africville: the uprooting of citizens from their territory in modern day Halifax, Wanda Thomas Bernard and Mary Pam Vincer; Migration, political engagement and the state: a case study of immigrants and Communists in 1930s South Tyneside in the UK, Tom Vickers; Called to serve: Zimbabwean social workers employed in the British Welfare State, Moreblessing Tandeka Tinarwo; Challenges to human rights and social justice in Denmark: an analysis of the a "Start Helpa (TM) program, Morten EjrnA|s and Helle Strauss. Part III Marginalised Identities: Citizenship Practices in Diverse Settings: Homelessness and social inclusion: the case of Projekt Udenfor in Denmark, Ann Dorthe Lund; My new Filipino is an Ethiopian, Abye TassA(c); Citizens or denizens: the stolen generations in Australia, Linda Briskman; Indigenous children and state care: the dark underside of citizenship, Jeannine CarriAre (Sohki Aski Esquao) and Robina Thomas (Qwul'sih'yah'maht); Citizenship of indigenous Greenlanders in a European nation state: the inclusionary practices of Iverneq, MarieKathrine Poppel; Culture and identity: a tool for social pedagogy?, Ole MeldgA[yen]rd; Citizenship, nation-state and social work: promises and pitfalls of social worka (TM)s alliance with the nation state, Walter Lorenz; Gender, inclusion and citizenship, Marion Brown; Whata (TM)s love got to do with it? An analysis of a "rights talka (TM) and the social citizenship of welfare recipients, Shalen Marie House; Developing inclusionary services for disabled people in Zimbabwe, Edson Munsaka; Citizenship and the a "looked-after childa (TM): securing permanency - aspiration or reality?, Bernie Walsh. Part IV Lessons from Citizenship Discourses: Practice and Educational Curricula: Personal reflections on supporting exchange students: challenges for citizenship, Tracie Metcalfe; Studentsa (TM) experiences of citizenship through international social work exchanges, Sarah Pflanz, Mauro Amatosi, Benjamin Hirtle and Duruta Hentze SA,rensen; Indigenous approaches to citizenship: lessons for higher education, Leslie Brown and Jacquie Green (Kundoqk); Identity, inclusion and citizenship: handling diverse identities in social work curricula, Judy E. MacDonald and Wanda Thomas Bernard; Emancipatory education: towards engaged citizenship, democratic practices and active community engagement, Vishanthie Sewpaul. Part V Inclusionary Citizenship Practices: Lessons for the Future: Critical theories: reflecting on citizenship status and practices, Lena Dominelli; Conclusions, Lena Dominelli. Bibliography; Index.

About the Author

Lena Dominelli is Professor in Applied Social Sciences at Durham University, UK. She was President of the International Association of Schools of Social Work (IASSW) from 1996-2004. Mehmoona Moosa-Mitha is Associate Professor at the School of Social Work, University of Victoria, Canada.

Reviews

'This book fills a significant gap in the literature on social work practice and will be greatly appreciated by social workers who work with immigrant and indigenous groups, asylum seekers, migrant workers, and exchange students as well as other marginalized people whose rights of citizenship are denied for political reasons. In the space of 24 succinct and informative chapters, Reconfiguring Citizenship expands our understanding of citizenship considerably and challenges our taken-for-granted assumptions concerning the rights of native-born and naturalized versus foreign residents of a country.' Katherine van Wormer, University of Northern Iowa, USA

EAN: 9781409448983
ISBN: 1409448983
Publisher: Ashgate Publishing Limited
Dimensions: 23.39 x 15.6 x 1.91 centimetres (0.75 kg)
Age Range: 15+ years
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