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The State and Capitalist Development in Africa
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Table of Contents

Introduction The African Condition: A Continuing Crisis The African Development Experience: History, Politics, Policy, and Choice Evolution of Development Theory and Its Application to African Development Disaggregating Capitalism in Africa: Theoretical Issues The State in Africa Alternative Futures in Africa Bibliography Index

About the Author

JULIUS E. NYANG'ORO is Visiting Assistant Professor of African Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His articles have appeared in journals such as African Political Science, Studies in Comparative International Development, and TransAfrica Forum.

Reviews

"Nyang'oro attempts to provide a theoretical alternative to the dependency and the modernization theories as the basis for explaining the historical development of African economies. Chapter 1 provides an excellent review of Africa's current economic crisis. Then the author thoroughly analyzes dependency and modernization theories as they relate to Africa and rejects them as being inadequate to explain the African case. Similarly, after review of the production and exchange process in Africa, he concludes that African states are not predominantly capitalistic. Believing that African's development experience can be analyzed only by looking at the state as an actor in the economic and political spheres, the author examines in depth the historical role of the state in African economies and attributes Africa's development failures largely to the inability of the state to encourage and promote capitalistic development and to the extensive role the state plays in the political economy. He is on target in concluding that "unless a fundamental restructuring of Africa's political economy is undertaken, no amount of foreign aid and political tinkering" will save Africa. However, this reviewer takes issue with the quickness and ease with which the author dismisses the relevance of both the dependency and modernization theories, finding unconvincing his analysis of the state as an "actor" in explaining Africa's current economic crisis. Nevertheless, Nyang'oro offers excellent research and documentation in this well-written and organized volume. Strongly recommended for reference and source materials to upper-division undergraduate and graduate students."-Choice ." . . This volume is a stimulating supplemental text for courses in African politics and economics. . . ."-Perspectives on Political Science "The work sees the African condition as a crisis in the areas of agricultural, environmental, industrial, and population problems. It looks at the development experiences of weak political governments unable to coordinate economic plans effectively."-Booknotes ?. . . This volume is a stimulating supplemental text for courses in African politics and economics. . . .?-Perspectives on Political Science ?The work sees the African condition as a crisis in the areas of agricultural, environmental, industrial, and population problems. It looks at the development experiences of weak political governments unable to coordinate economic plans effectively.?-Booknotes ?Nyang'oro attempts to provide a theoretical alternative to the dependency and the modernization theories as the basis for explaining the historical development of African economies. Chapter 1 provides an excellent review of Africa's current economic crisis. Then the author thoroughly analyzes dependency and modernization theories as they relate to Africa and rejects them as being inadequate to explain the African case. Similarly, after review of the production and exchange process in Africa, he concludes that African states are not predominantly capitalistic. Believing that African's development experience can be analyzed only by looking at the state as an actor in the economic and political spheres, the author examines in depth the historical role of the state in African economies and attributes Africa's development failures largely to the inability of the state to encourage and promote capitalistic development and to the extensive role the state plays in the political economy. He is on target in concluding that "unless a fundamental restructuring of Africa's political economy is undertaken, no amount of foreign aid and political tinkering" will save Africa. However, this reviewer takes issue with the quickness and ease with which the author dismisses the relevance of both the dependency and modernization theories, finding unconvincing his analysis of the state as an "actor" in explaining Africa's current economic crisis. Nevertheless, Nyang'oro offers excellent research and documentation in this well-written and organized volume. Strongly recommended for reference and source materials to upper-division undergraduate and graduate students.?-Choice

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