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The present work is a study in the history of an enduring idea that defines the inner life of the mind and also supplied a substratum for the twentieth-century literary imagination and substance for philosophical thinking, producing a unique alliance between philosophy and literature. This special union was forged by a new holistic conception of time which supplemented, and even supplanted, the conventional sense of chronological time. This temporal turn animated the existential insights of Husserl, Heidegger, and Bergson, but it was grounded in nineteenth-century advances in the biological sciences, the hegemony of Hegelianism, and even stretched back to Augustine's early meditation on time in Book XI of his Confessions. In linking together a set of thinkers who addressed this form of temporal consciousness, Gabriel R. Ricci illuminates a common intellectual preoccupation from the vantage point of a concept. The authors do not together assemble the thought; it is the thought that produced a collective voice. This voice appears in the episodes outlined in each chapter, and they are framed by an introduction, which explores Joseph Frank's insights into the new spatial forms in literature, and an epilogue, which resurrects J.W. Dunne's peculiar dream experiments and theory of precognition. Ricci employs Frank's seminal essay to draw comparisons between literature's adaptation of the new time sense and philosophy's expression of the new compatibility between space and time. Dunne's theory serves to demonstrate the continuity between literary form and philosophical speculation.
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-The Tempo of Modernity is a solid recommendation for college-level audiences studying literature, philosophy and culture alike, and provides a survey of how time began to bend in the first half of the 20th century, influenced by new physics and Halley's Comet. Perceptions of time in general and the particular concept of 'time bending' as a system of literary criticism are the theme of an excellent study that considers a range of modern concepts and writings about them. It's a recommended pick for any college-level literary and philosophy holding.- --The Bookwatch -In The Tempo of Modernity, Gabriel Ricci offers a finely etched study of time and its interpreters in the modern world. Masterfully negotiating a stellar cast of poets, novelists, theorists, and philosophers, Ricci explores the temporal concerns that moved such major figures as Proust, Eliot, Bergson, and Huxley. More than a philosophy of time, The Tempo of Modernity is an elegantly conceived cultural study that illuminates twentieth-century conceptions of existence, eternity, and immortality.- --David Brown, professor of history, Elizabethtown College, author of Richard Hofstadter: An Intellectual Biography -Gabriel Ricci's The Tempo of Modernity is a deeply satisfying expression of how time began to bend in the first half of the twentieth century, influenced by Einstein's new physics and a visitation by Halley's Comet. 'Time is not a river; it is a vast landscape, and it is only the eye of the beholder that moves' (Thornton Wilder). From this perspective, time is an inclusive tapestry from which can be seen all at once the events of history.... Only recently have U.S. literary scholars begun to embrace 'time bending' as a system of literary criticism, while Europe and the East have done so for much longer. Ricci is ahead of the field in this synthesis of unique visions into his own unique vision.- --David Garrett Izzo, the author of The Influence of Mysticism on 20th Century British and American Literature, and Christopher Isherwood: His Era, His Gang, and the Legacy of the Truly Strong Man "The Tempo of Modernity is a solid recommendation for college-level audiences studying literature, philosophy and culture alike, and provides a survey of how time began to bend in the first half of the 20th century, influenced by new physics and Halley's Comet. Perceptions of time in general and the particular concept of 'time bending' as a system of literary criticism are the theme of an excellent study that considers a range of modern concepts and writings about them. It's a recommended pick for any college-level literary and philosophy holding." --The Bookwatch "In The Tempo of Modernity, Gabriel Ricci offers a finely etched study of time and its interpreters in the modern world. Masterfully negotiating a stellar cast of poets, novelists, theorists, and philosophers, Ricci explores the temporal concerns that moved such major figures as Proust, Eliot, Bergson, and Huxley. More than a philosophy of time, The Tempo of Modernity is an elegantly conceived cultural study that illuminates twentieth-century conceptions of existence, eternity, and immortality." --David Brown, professor of history, Elizabethtown College, author of Richard Hofstadter: An Intellectual Biography "Gabriel Ricci's The Tempo of Modernity is a deeply satisfying expression of how time began to bend in the first half of the twentieth century, influenced by Einstein's new physics and a visitation by Halley's Comet. 'Time is not a river; it is a vast landscape, and it is only the eye of the beholder that moves' (Thornton Wilder). From this perspective, time is an inclusive tapestry from which can be seen all at once the events of history.... Only recently have U.S. literary scholars begun to embrace 'time bending' as a system of literary criticism, while Europe and the East have done so for much longer. Ricci is ahead of the field in this synthesis of unique visions into his own unique vision." --David Garrett Izzo, the author of The Influence of Mysticism on 20th Century British and American Literature, and Christopher Isherwood: His Era, His Gang, and the Legacy of the Truly Strong Man "The Tempo of Modernity is a solid recommendation for college-level audiences studying literature, philosophy and culture alike, and provides a survey of how time began to bend in the first half of the 20th century, influenced by new physics and Halley's Comet. Perceptions of time in general and the particular concept of 'time bending' as a system of literary criticism are the theme of an excellent study that considers a range of modern concepts and writings about them. It's a recommended pick for any college-level literary and philosophy holding." --The Bookwatch "In The Tempo of Modernity, Gabriel Ricci offers a finely etched study of time and its interpreters in the modern world. Masterfully negotiating a stellar cast of poets, novelists, theorists, and philosophers, Ricci explores the temporal concerns that moved such major figures as Proust, Eliot, Bergson, and Huxley. More than a philosophy of time, The Tempo of Modernity is an elegantly conceived cultural study that illuminates twentieth-century conceptions of existence, eternity, and immortality." --David Brown, professor of history, Elizabethtown College, author of Richard Hofstadter: An Intellectual Biography "Gabriel Ricci's The Tempo of Modernity is a deeply satisfying expression of how time began to bend in the first half of the twentieth century, influenced by Einstein's new physics and a visitation by Halley's Comet. 'Time is not a river; it is a vast landscape, and it is only the eye of the beholder that moves' (Thornton Wilder). From this perspective, time is an inclusive tapestry from which can be seen all at once the events of history.... Only recently have U.S. literary scholars begun to embrace 'time bending' as a system of literary criticism, while Europe and the East have done so for much longer. Ricci is ahead of the field in this synthesis of unique visions into his own unique vision." --David Garrett Izzo, the author of The Influence of Mysticism on 20th Century British and American Literature, and Christopher Isherwood: His Era, His Gang, and the Legacy of the Truly Strong Man "[A] fine recommendation for college-level audiences studying literature, philosophy and culture." --The Bookwatch "In The Tempo of Modernity, Gabriel Ricci offers a finely etched study of time and its interpreters in the modern world. Masterfully negotiating a stellar cast of poets, novelists, theorists, and philosophers, Ricci explores the temporal concerns that moved such major figures as Proust, Eliot, Bergson, and Huxley. More than a philosophy of time, The Tempo of Modernity is an elegantly conceived cultural study that illuminates twentieth-century conceptions of existence, eternity, and immortality." --David Brown, professor of history, Elizabethtown College, author of Richard Hofstadter: An Intellectual Biography "Gabriel Ricci's The Tempo of Modernity is a deeply satisfying expression of how time began to bend in the first half of the twentieth century, influenced by Einstein's new physics and a visitation by Halley's Comet. 'Time is not a river; it is a vast landscape, and it is only the eye of the beholder that moves' (Thornton Wilder). From this perspective, time is an inclusive tapestry from which can be seen all at once the events of history.... Only recently have U.S. literary scholars begun to embrace 'time bending' as a system of literary criticism, while Europe and the East have done so for much longer. Ricci is ahead of the field in this synthesis of unique visions into his own unique vision." --David Garrett Izzo, the author of The Influence of Mysticism on 20th Century British and American Literature, and Christopher Isherwood: His Era, His Gang, and the Legacy of the Truly Strong Man "In The Tempo of Modernity, Gabriel Ricci offers a finely etched study of time and its interpreters in the modern world. Masterfully negotiating a stellar cast of poets, novelists, theorists, and philosophers, Ricci explores the temporal concerns that moved such major figures as Proust, Eliot, Bergson, and Huxley. More than a philosophy of time, The Tempo of Modernity is an elegantly conceived cultural study that illuminates twentieth-century conceptions of existence, eternity, and immortality." --David Brown, professor of history, Elizabethtown College, author of Richard Hofstadter: An Intellectual Biography "Gabriel Ricci's The Tempo of Modernity is a deeply satisfying expression of how time began to bend in the first half of the twentieth century, influenced by Einstein's new physics and a visitation by Halley's Comet. 'Time is not a river; it is a vast landscape, and it is only the eye of the beholder that moves' (Thornton Wilder). From this perspective, time is an inclusive tapestry from which can be seen all at once the events of history.... Only recently have U.S. literary scholars begun to embrace 'time bending' as a system of literary criticism, while Europe and the East have done so for much longer. Ricci is ahead of the field in this synthesis of unique visions into his own unique vision." --David Garrett Izzo, the author of The Influence of Mysticism on 20th Century British and American Literature, and Christopher Isherwood: His Era, His Gang, and the Legacy of the Truly Strong Man "In The Tempo of Modernity, Gabriel Ricci offers a finely etched study of time and its interpreters in the modern world. Masterfully negotiating a stellar cast of poets, novelists, theorists, and philosophers, Ricci explores the temporal concerns that moved such major figures as Proust, Eliot, Bergson, and Huxley. More than a philosophy of time, The Tempo of Modernity is an elegantly conceived cultural study that illuminates twentieth-century conceptions of existence, eternity, and immortality."--David Brown, professor of history, Elizabethtown College, author of Richard Hofstadter: An Intellectual Biography"Gabriel Ricci's The Tempo of Modernity is a deeply satisfying expression of how time began to bend in the first half of the twentieth century, influenced by Einstein's new physics and a visitation by Halley's Comet. 'Time is not a river; it is a vast landscape, and it is only the eye of the beholder that moves' (Thornton Wilder). From this perspective, time is an inclusive tapestry from which can be seen all at once the events of history.... Only recently have U.S. literary scholars begun to embrace 'time bending' as a system of literary criticism, while Europe and the East have done so for much longer. Ricci is ahead of the field in this synthesis of unique visions into his own unique vision."--David Garrett Izzo, the author of The Influence of Mysticism on 20th Century British and American Literature, and Christopher Isherwood: His Era, His Gang, and the Legacy of the Truly Strong Man

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