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Would You Eat Your Cat?
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Jeremy Stangroom has a PhD from the London School of Economics. He is currently the New Media editor of The Philosophers' Magazine, which he founded with Julian Baggini in 1997. He is the author/editor of numerous books, including Einstein's Riddle, The Little Book of Big Ideas: Philosophy and The Little Book of Big Ideas: Religion. He is also Series Editor, with James Garvey, of Continuum Books' series on Contemporary Social Issues. Stangroom is an elected fellow of the Committee for the Scientific Examination of Religion.

About the Author

Jeremy Stangroom has a PhD from the London School of Economics. He is currently the New Media editor of The Philosophers' Magazine, which he founded with Julian Baggini in 1997. He is the author/editor of numerous books, including Einstein's Riddle, The Little Book of Big Ideas: Philosophy and The Little Book of Big Ideas: Religion. He is also Series Editor, with James Garvey, of Continuum Books' series on Contemporary Social Issues. Stangroom is an elected fellow of the Committee for the Scientific Examination of Religion.

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Stangroom, cofounder of The Philosophers' Magazine, does a solid job of presenting common moral dilemmas in digestible form, though not with much depth or subtlety. With four sections of hypotheticals ("Ethical Impasses," "Rights and Responsibilities," "Crime and Punishment," and "Society and Politics") followed by a "Responses" section that addresses more than two dozen specific scenarios, this look at the philosophy of personality falls short of delivering a straightforward argument. With a format reminiscent of Two-Minute Mysteries and other books for younger readers, it is guaranteed to annoy some, as there's no apparent reason why the discussion of, say, whether torture is justified to stop a bomb from exploding does not follow directly upon the delineation of the situation. Furthermore, farcical names (e.g., Emperor Q. Woolius Liberalis) will appeal more to the inexperienced philosopher. There is some promise as interesting conundrums are addressed-for example, whether we should sacrifice one life to save five. Agent: Elwin Street. (Nov.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

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