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the history of economics
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Table of Contents

Part 1 Classical and Marxian economics: expenditure patterns and international trade in Quesney's tableau economique; the role of demand in Adam Smith's theory of natural price; the labour theory of value in the Ricardian theory of international trade; Ricardo and Morishima on machinery; comments on Ekelund "Mill's Recantation of the Wages Fund"; Thornton's criticism of equilibrium theory and mill; on equilibrium and disequilibrium - a reply to Ekelund and Thommesen; F.D. Longe and refutation of classical theory of capital; Marx and Bohm-Bawerk in the theory of interest; Marx and Bohm-Bawerk; Samuelson, Saigal and Emmanuel's theory of international unequal exchange. Part 2 Marginal revolution and after: studies of von Thunen in Japan; a note on Jevons's law of indifference and competitive equilibrium; competition and the number of participants - lessons of Edgeworth's theorem; Bertrand's duopoly considered as an Edgeworth's game of exchange; non-Walrasian foundations of macroeconomics; Wicksell's missing equation - a comment; Wicksell's missing equation and Bohm-Bawerks three causes of interest in a stationary state; economic structure and the theory of economic equilibrium; on the non-existence of equilibrium; comment, minisymposium, the history of economics and the history of science.

About the Author

Takashi Negishi, Professor Emeritus, University of Tokyo, Japan and Member of the Japan Academy

Reviews

'. . . a stimulating intellectual challenge to many readers.' -- Ian Steedman, The Manchester School

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